Faf du Plessis critical of Vernon Philander’s overall fitness and absence

 

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Faf du Plessis delivered a withering assessment of Vernon Philander’s overall fitness following South Africa’s series defeat in England and told the wider public it is time to move on from the prospect of AB de Villiers ever returning to Test cricket.

Speaking after the 3-1 loss, the Proteas captain was simply asked about the frustration of the back spasms suffered by Philander that ruled him out a final Test that could have levelled the series and opted to make a point about his conditioning.

“Vern needs to work on his fitness. It’s happened too often he doesn’t play a full series and I have spoken to him about that and he’s accepted the challenge that he needs to improve,” said Du Plessis, who was denied a senior bowler he described as the world’s best in seaming conditions, having dominated England’s top order with 10 wickets in the first three Tests.

In the last of those, a 239-run defeat at The Oval, Philander struggled throughout after suffering from a stomach virus that had him spend one night in hospital on a drip. Nevetheless Du Plessis expected the 32-year-old to be ready for Old Trafford once clear of this illness only for a niggle the captain considered minor to crop up.

Graeme Smith, South Africa’s former captain, was first to query this early in the 177-run defeat that followed and, when asked if it was justified, Du Plessis replied: “It’s fair that you need to play a lot of cricket for your country and be available for selection. I think Vern will agree with that.

“Too many times the team has gasped ‘Vern could be injured again’. So he understands from a fitness point of view with important series coming up, Australia and India at home, he needs to be fit to get through all eight Tests.”

In Morne Morkel and Keshav Maharaj South Africa had two bowlers who stepped up across the duration of the tour’s Test leg, claiming 19 and 17 wickets respectively (the former was named their player of the series by England). But a glass-jawed top six that returned only one century from Dean Elgar and a single batsman averaging over 40 in Hashim Amla, was culpable.

The continuing absence of De Villiers was felt. Unquestionably one of the greatest batsmen South Africa has produced, the 33-year-old remains the limited overs captain and a Twenty20 freelancer but is currently taking an indefinite sabbatical from playing the Test arena that has now run 18 months and appears only a statement away from official retirement.

Talks between De Villiers and Cricket South Africa about his future are due to come soon, offering a glimmer of hope that he may be coaxed into the challenge of two upcoming marquee home summer series against India and Australia. But Du Plessis, among his closest friends from schoolboy to professional cricket, is doubtful.

He added: “We all know how good AB is and we missed him but we’ve spent too much time talking about, ‘When is AB going to come back?’

“The hope of him coming back is something I think we need to move past … and we need to find someone else who can fulfil those roles. Obviously you don’t just replace those players. If AB comes back, it’s a huge bonus. But I don’t expect it.”

Laura Muir refuses to enter Caster Semenya debate after heartbreak

Image result for Laura Muir refuses to enter Caster Semenya debate after heartbreak

Laura Muir was close to tears after missing out on a world championship 1500m medal by seven hundredths of a second to South Africa’s Caster Semenya.

Muir had led for much of the race but ran out of gas down the home straight and was beaten to bronze by Semenya, the Olympic 800m champion. South Africa’s Semenya later attempted to shut down debate over hyperandrogenism, the medical condition she has which is characterised by excessive levels of male sex hormones such as testosterone.

Athletics’ world governing body, the IAAF, is putting together a case to convince the court of arbitration for sport that Semenya’s condition gives her an unfair advantage over her rivals. Semenya could be forced to undergo hormone replacement therapy or face being unable to compete in the future.

“I really don’t have time for nonsense,” she said. “I do not think about something that might happen in eight months. I don’t focus on the IAAF. It’s not my business. My business is to train hard and see what I come up with in competition.”

Muir refused to be drawn into the complex debate round Semenya’s participation in these championships. “I’ve not got anything to say about that,” she said.

The race was won by Kenya’s Faith Kipyegon in 4min 02.59sec while experience proved valuable for the 30-year-old American Jenny Simpson who ran an exquisitely judged race to take silver.

London 2017 organisers have ordered a floor in one of the hotels used by competitors to be quarantined after an outbreak of gastroenteritis.

Botswana’s Isaac Makwala, a medal prospect in the 400m, was given medical dispensation to withdraw from the 200m heats after throwing up in the call room.

A number of other athletes staying at the same hotel also have gastroenteritis, including the Ireland 400m hurdler Thomas Barr. “I’m gutted to have to withdraw from the semi-final. My whole year has been focused on the world championships. To not be able to go out and compete for Ireland is beyond disappointing.”

An organisers’ statement read: “Those affected have been supported by both team and local organising committee medical staff. In addition we have been working with Public Health England to ensure the situation is managed and contained.

“As a result, further advice and guidelines have been issued to team doctors and support staff – standard procedure for such an occurrence where a number of teams are occupying championship accommodation.”

Kenyans queue for hours to vote amid fears of post-election violence

 

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Result of tight contest between Uhuru Kenyatta and Raila Odinga could be known by Wednesday morning.

Long queues formed outside polling stations across Kenya on Tuesday morning as fiercely contested presidential elections got under way following last-minute calls for calm from officials and politicians.

Many voters had waited for hours in the rain to choose between the incumbent, Uhuru Kenyatta, who has been in power since 2013, or the veteran opposition politician Raila Odinga. The most recent polls did not indicate a clear winner.

An estimated 180,000 police officers and members of the security forces have been deployed amid fears of violence after the result is announced, which may be as early as Wednesday morning.

The campaign was marred by hundreds of violent incidents – including the murder of a high-profile election official – issues with new voting technology and widespread concerns about fraud.

More than 1,100 people died after the losers rejected the election result in 2007.

In recent days bus stations have been busy as many Kenyans have left major cities for provincial areas which are seen as safer. Others have stockpiled groceries, phone cards and other essentials.

Election officials have circulated short videos on social media calling on voters to accept that in a “healthy democracy there are winners and losers”.

Kenyatta, 55, addressed the nation on Monday night, urging citizens to vote “in peace” while the former US president Barack Obama, whose father was born in Kenya, led international calls for a violence-free election.

“I urge Kenyan leaders to reject violence and incitement; respect the will of the people,” Obama said in a statement.

There are more than 19 million registered voters in the nation of 48 million. Half are aged under 35. They will vote in 40,000 polling stations.

Pamela Mwande, 33, said she had voted for Kenyatta in the upscale Lavington area of Nairobi.

“[The president] has been a good leader. We should not have change and disruption and fuss,” she said.

Observers see the election as the last showdown of a dynastic rivalry between the families of Kenyatta and Odinga, 72, that has lasted more than half a century.

The presidential candidates’ fathers – Jomo Kenyatta and Jaramogi Oginga Odinga – fought together for independence from Britain in 1963 before becoming bitter rivals.

Odinga is making his fourth attempt to gain power. He claims that elections in 2007 and 2013 were stolen from him.

The men belong to two of the country’s main ethnic groups, Kenyatta from the Kikuyu, the largest, and Odinga from the Luo.

Both have built coalitions with other influential communities in a country where voting still takes place largely along ethnic lines.

Kenyatta’s first term saw a massive infrastructure drive and steady economic growth of more than 5%, making Kenya one of the best performing economies in Africa.

However his record has been undermined by soaring food prices, ongoing high unemployment and major corruption scandals.

 

China-India border spat casts shadow ahead of BRICS summit

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China is taking an increasingly tough line on a border row with India amid a rising crescendo of nationalism in state media, and President Xi Jinping looks set for an awkward encounter with Prime Minister Narendra Modi at a multilateral summit next month.

Diplomats say Beijing would like to resolve the border issue before a summit of the BRICS nations – that also groups Brazil, Russia and South Africa – in the Chinese city of Xiamen in early September, and ensure nothing dampens what China wants to be a show of cooperation and friendship among developing countries.

But that could be tough. On Wednesday, China ramped up the rhetoric, accusing India of “concocting” excuses over the illegal entry of the South Asian nation’s military into Chinese territory.

“China will take all necessary measures to safeguard its legitimate and lawful rights and interests,” the Foreign Ministry said.

The two sides’ troops are confronting each other close to a valley controlled by China that separates India from its close ally, Bhutan, and gives China access to the so-called Chicken’s Neck, a thin strip of land connecting India and its remote northeastern regions.

Responding, India reiterated an earlier line that work by a Chinese road crew in the sensitive frontier area would have changed the status quo and urging “utmost restraint” by all sides.

“India considers that peace and tranquillity in the India-China border areas is an important pre-requisite for smooth development of our bilateral relations with China,” New Delhi’s foreign ministry said in a statement on Wednesday evening.

Most previous standoffs, such as one in 2014 just ahead of a rare trip to India for Xi, were resolved with both sides withdrawing their forces. There has been no shooting since a brief border war in 1962.

Talks are happening behind the scenes, but with little apparent progress. Meantime, Chinese and India media have been taking a strident approach, with a Chinese state-run newspaper last week saying China could use force.

An Indian magazine’s front cover last month showing a map of China shorn of Tibet and self-ruled Taiwan also ignited public anger on Chinese social media with thousands of angry posts.

“The problem is the media on both sides are whipping things up. This makes it hard for China or India to back down,” said a Beijing-based source who is familiar with the discussions between the two sides.

The Indian government has asked political parties to refrain from politicising the issue and allow diplomacy to work.

“Show What We Are Made of”

China’s defence ministry last week also warned India not to harbour any illusions about the Chinese military’s ability to defend its territory.

A source with ties to the military, who spoke recently to a senior Chinese officer involved in the stand off, said China has no appetite for conflict with India but could not be seen to be weak.

“Nobody wants to fight about this, but if India keeps making trouble then we’ll have to show them what we’re made of,” the source said, citing the conversation with the senior officer.

China has repeatedly called on India to withdraw its forces.

An Indian government source closely tracking the standoff said there was no change in the ground situation in Doklam, with the two sides remaining in a standoff.

Indian military expert Nitin Gokhale said India was prepared for a long haul.

“The decision is to stay resolute on the ground and reasonable in diplomacy,” Gokhale said.

China has been briefing foreign diplomats on the stand off, saying it wants a resolution but that its patience won’t last for ever.

“There’s no easy solution,” said an Asian diplomat, who attended a briefing, referring to both sides’ insistence that they are in the right.

For the time being, China looks ready to keep things calm, said another Asian diplomat, familiar with China’s thinking on the issue.

“China really wants to resolve this ahead of the BRICS summit. It doesn’t want anything to affect the atmosphere,” the diplomat said. “The gloves could come off after the summit though.”

China and India have long been suspicious of each other, a legacy of the 1962 border war, India’s playing host to exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama and China’s close relations with India’s regional rival Pakistan.India has privately raised objections to Chinese firm Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Group’s proposed $1.3 billion takeover of Indian drugmaker Gland Pharma, a source familiar with the matter said on Monday.

Ajit Doval, India’s national security adviser, visited Beijing last week for a BRICS security meeting, and had bilateral talks with his Chinese opposite number, top diplomat Yang Jiechi, who outranks the foreign minister.

A Chinese government statement on that meeting did not mention the border issue.

China and India are already suspicious of each other because of China’s massive investments in Pakistan and Sri Lanka, including Chinese-invested ports in both countries India fears could one day become Chinese military bases, another senior Asian diplomatic source said.

“Nobody wants to get caught in the middle of this,” the diplomat said, pointing to the prospect for the border tensions worsening and becoming a wider Asian security issue dragging in other countries.

Michael Clarke flies young Nepalese spinner to Australia to train at his academy

The young leg-spinner from Nepal Sandeep Lamichhane is currently staying with a local family as he prepares to play for Michael Clarke’s club.

Sandeep Lamichhane,16, from Nepal impressed Michael Clarke recently during his coaching spell in Hong Kong. The former Australian captain was impressed with the leg-spinner’s outstanding potential and that promted him to allow Lamichhane to train at his academy at Sydney and play for his club.

Sandeep Lamichhane

“It is a really exciting opportunity to have such a talented Nepalese cricketer travel this distance to come and test his skills and improve his game at my academy. Sandeep is a fantastic young man who enjoys his cricket and is extremely passionate about the game,” said Clarke, who sponsored the boy to get him to Australia.

Lamichhane who has already represented Nepal under-19s is staying in Sydney with a local family as he prepares for the upcoming season where he is going to play for Pup’s club Western Sydney.

“Thank you very much @MClarke23 for your kind words and for inviting me to Australia. Looking forward to give my best,” Lamichhane tweeted on Tuesday.

Manchester City eyeing nothing less than a win in Manchester derby: David Silva

Table-topper Manchester City sit marginally above Manchester United on goal difference after both sides won their first three league games but the Citizen swill miss Sergio Aguero for the crucial clash on Saturday.

Nothing less than victory will do for Manchester City in Saturday’s feisty Premier League derby against Manchester United, playmaker David Silva has said.

David Silva

Silva, who scored both goals in Spain’s friendly win over Belgium last week and two more against Liechtenstein in their World Cup qualifier on Monday, has featured in all of City’s league games this season under manager Pep Guardiola.

Table-topper City sit marginally above United on goal difference after both sides won their first three league games.

“It’s going to be a very beautiful game. The two teams arrive to this game having taken good results and after making wholesale changes in every sense,” the 30-year-old told Spanish radio station Cope.

“We’ve started the season very well and it should be a great game. But we won’t be playing for a draw. We will go out to win the match.”

City have won three times and drew one in their last five top flight meetings with United at Old Trafford.

“It’s a ground where in the last few years things have gone okay for us. We know they are a very difficult rival – but we won’t settle for a draw,” Silva added.

Chinese Economic Cyber-Espionage Plummets in the US

The Chinese government appears to be abiding by its September pledge to stop supporting the hacking of American trade secrets to help companies there compete, private US security executives and government advisors said on Monday.

Chinese Economic Cyber-Espionage Plummets in the US: FireEye

FireEye Inc, the US network security company best known for fighting sophisticated Chinese hacking, said in a report released late Monday that breaches attributed to China-based groups had plunged by 90 percent in the past two years. The most dramatic drop came during last summer’s run-up to the bilateral agreement, it added.

FireEye’s Mandiant unit in 2013 famously blamed a specific unit of China’s Peoples Liberation Army for a major campaign of economic espionage.

Kevin Mandia, the Mandiant founder who took over last week as FireEye chief executive, said in an interview that several factors seemed to be behind the shift. He cited embarrassment from Mandiant’s 2013 report and the following year’s indictment of five PLA officers from the same unitMandiant uncovered.

Prosecutors said the victims included US Steel, Alcoa Inc and Westinghouse Electric. Mandia also cited the threat just before the agreement that the United States could impose sanctions on Chinese officials and companies.

“They all contributed to a positive result,” Mandia said.

A senior Obama administration official said the government was not yet ready to proclaim that China was fully complying with the agreement but said the new report would factor into its monitoring. “We are still doing an assessment,” said the official, speaking on condition he not be named.

The official added that a just-concluded second round of talks with China on the finer points of the agreement had gone well. He noted that China had sent senior leaders even after the US Secretary of Homeland Security pulled out because of the Orlando shootings.

FireEye said that Chinese intrusions into some US firms have continued, with at least two hacked in 2016. But while the hackers installed “back doors” to enable future spying, FireEye said it had seen no evidence that data was stolen.

Both hacked companies had government contracts, said FireEye analyst Laura Galante, noting that it was plausible that the intrusions were stepping stones toward gathering information on government or military people or projects, which remain fair game under the September accord.

FireEye and other security companies said that as the Chinese government-backed hackers dropped wholesale theft of US intellectual property, they increased spying on political and military targets in other countries and regions, including Russia, the Middle East, Japan and South Korea.

Another security firm, CrowdStrike, has observed more Chinese state-supported hackers spying outside of the United States over the past year, company Vice President Adam Meyers said in an interview.

Targets include Russian and Ukrainian military targets, Indian political groups and the Mongolian mining industry, Meyers said.

FireEye and CrowdStrike said they were confident that the attacks are being carried out either directly by the Chinese government or on its behalf by hired contractors.

Since late last year there has been a flurry of new espionage activity against Russian government agencies and technology firms, as well as other targets in India, Japan and South Korea, said Kurt Baumgartner, a researcher with Russian security software maker Kaspersky Lab.

He said those groups use tools and infrastructure that depend on Chinese-language characters.

One of those groups, known as Mirage or APT 15, appears to have ended a spree of attacks on the US energy sector and is now focusing on government and diplomatic targets in Russia and former Soviet republics, Baumgartner said.

International Yoga Day: Embrace Yoga to Age Gracefully, Say Experts

Yoga won’t give you immortality but this ancient discipline of bringing union between the body, mind and spirit can definitely help you fight age – both physical and mental, say health and wellness experts.

International Yoga Day: Embrace Yoga to Age Gracefully, Say Experts

“In my practice in India and abroad I have seen several cases where my clients have gotten better by regular yoga, pranayam and meditation,” Preeti Rao, Health, Lifestyle and Wellness Consultant at Max Healthcare.

Regular yoga practice can help fight chronic lifestyle diseases like hypertension, hormonal imbalances, diabetes, reproductive disorders, and respiratory and cardiovascular related health concerns. Besides people with obesity, anxiety, constipation and digestive disorders can benefit significantly from practising yoga, according to the experts.

“From diabetes to high blood pressure, high cholesterol to heart problems, yoga can help you combat many such health issues that usually develop over the years. Also, arthritis is one of the most common problems among elderly people and yoga is a great way to tone it down and help the body become more active and flexible,” said Nidhi Arora, physiotherapist at AktivOrtho, an orthopaedic, neurological and gynaecological rehabilitation centre.

“Individuals prone to osteoporosis or are already suffering from the problem can gain a lot from yoga as a daily life discipline which increases bone density and growth. To keep a watch over increase in weight as well, yoga proves to be very helpful,” Arora noted.

Yoga can improve blood flow in the body and increase oxygen supply to body cells. It helps improve balance which tends to become weak as one ages, acclaimed fitness expert and nutritionist Sonia Bajaj said. What’s more, the benefits of yoga transcends physical fitness alone.

“Yoga is not limited to yoga or physical exercise,” Rao said.

Scholarly studies and research in this area have strongly documented how yoga helps in improving cognitive abilities.

“Pranayama helps one to attain a better balance between the right and left-brain bringing more balance between emotional and rational thinking. Meditation facilitates a process of introspection, and brings more clarity and focus in one’s life. Regular yoga also improves memory,” Rao noted.

“A regular yoga practice even for just 20-30 minutes daily that is simple and involves varied breathing exercises and mediation is what I would recommend to remain sharp, alert and for a balanced life,” she added.

A recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that a three-month course of Kundalini yoga and Kirtan Kriya meditation practice helped minimise the cognitive and emotional problems that often precede Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, brain disorders that impair the memory.

Kirtan Kriya, which involves chanting, hand movements and visualisation of light, has been practiced for hundreds of years in India as a way to prevent cognitive decline in older adults. Yoga and meditation was even more effective than the memory enhancement exercises that have been considered the gold standard for managing mild cognitive impairment, the findings showed.

“Historically and anecdotally, yoga has been thought to be beneficial in ageing well, but this is the scientific demonstration of that benefit,” lead author of the study Harris Eyre, doctoral candidate at the University of Adelaide in Australia, said.

“If you or your relatives are trying to improve your memory or offset the risk for developing memory loss or dementia, a regular practice of yoga and meditation could be a simple, safe and low-cost solution to improving your brain fitness,” Helen Lavretsky, the study’s senior author and professor in residence in the department of psychiatry, University of California-Los Angeles, suggested.

“Yoga forms like asana, pranayama and a regular devotion towards meditation are such strong tools that they are bound to invigorate the brain, help enhance the power of the mind and stimulate the nervous system as well. Yoga should be taken seriously as results from it are long-lasting and life-changing for sure,” Arora noted.

However, with many different types of yoga being practiced today, it is important for you to find out with the help of experts which type of yoga meets your needs, she said.

‘We’re Horrified’: At Stanford, The Impact Of A Sexual Assault Is Searing

It could have been mistaken for any other late afternoon in the expectant days before graduation. Seniors shuttled four years of possessions from the Kappa Alpha fraternity into waiting U-Hauls that would carry them away from Stanford for the last time.

But the students weren’t talking just about commencement, or summer, or jobs ahead. Their conversations this week, like so many on this elite campus these days, kept turning to sexual assault.

'We're Horrified': At Stanford, The Impact Of A Sexual Assault Is Searing

It was inescapable on their phones and laptops, what happened just a few hundred feet away and its lingering impact: A woman left one of their parties drunk, passed out behind a dumpster and was attacked by a Stanford swimmer.

“We’re horrified that this happened here,” said Dominick Francks, 22, a Kappa Alpha brother majoring in atmosphere/energy and computer science. “Everyone is pretty blown away.”

As the nation was riveted this week by the victim’s account of the January 2015 assault and its effects on her, this community has continued to cope with — and learn from — what has become a prime example of the problem of college sexual violence. Here, at Stanford, it overshadowed everything else.

Within an hour of the victim’s letter being posted online, Kappa Alpha fraternity brothers’ phones lit up: “You need to read this.”

Fraternity members said they were deeply shaken by the letter, describing it as eloquent, eye-opening and brave. One said he hoped the letter would become required reading at Stanford.

The case resonated nationally because it encapsulated the problem of sexual assault on campus, with all its complexities and jarring headlines, from the Baylor football team’s assaults that led to the ouster of the school’s football coach and president to high-profile cases at Vanderbilt, Florida State and so many others.

People argued over whether binge drinking was to blame, or fraternity culture or the entitlement of privilege. Some saw it as proof that sexual assault is treated differently when the accused is an athlete, a campus leader, an outstanding student. A statement from Turner’s father — arguing against jail time because the life his son had worked so hard to achieve would never happen and saying “That is a steep price to pay for 20 minutes of action out of his 20 plus years of life” — went viral.

Here in Palo Alto, the impact is visceral. Inboxes and social media are full of links to petitions: People demanding better support from the university for sexual assault victims, calling on Stanford officials to apologize and pay for the victim’s therapy, and asking the judge in the case to step down. A protest is planned for Sunday at an annual commencement event.

“Everyone on campus is talking about it,” said Dulcie Davies, a graduating sorority member who plays field hockey. “Everyone is sharing everything on Facebook.”

The reaction to the victim’s letter was the culmination of many months of soul-searching, said Victor Xu, a rising senior who is managing editor of The Stanford Daily. It’s a constant topic of conversation online and on campus, over dinner, in random conversations with friends and within families, he said.

It was just outside the Kappa Alpha house last year that a freshman left the party drunk and sexually assaulted an unconscious woman. Brock Turner, a varsity swimmer and Olympic hopeful, withdrew from the school, was banned from campus and was convicted of three felony counts of sexual assault.

When the 20-year-old from Ohio was sentenced last week — to six months in jail, three years of probation and a life as a registered sex offender — many people were shocked. The prosecutor had asked for six years in prison.

When the letter the victim read in court, 12 pages of eloquent agony, was published on Buzzfeed, it ignited: More than a million people signed online petitions demanding that Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky be removed from the bench, and a formal recall effort was launched. Persky got death threats.

The events prompted difficult questions within the university’s Greek system. Although Turner was never a member of Kappa Alpha, the fact that he met the victim at one of their parties, and assaulted her nearby, was troubling to many at Stanford.

In recent months, fraternities have hosted women’s groups to talk about sexual assault. Kappa Alpha had events on sexual health and masculinity. Members said they saw brothers break down in tears as they shared stories about pressure to succeed — academically, athletically and with women — and not show vulnerability.

Fraternities had been on notice since July 2014, when sexist jokes at a toga party at Sigma Alpha Epsilon led to harassment complaints. The students later permanently lost their house.

News of the Turner assault made women on campus feel less safe, Davies said. But the victim’s letter, released last week, and the campus discussions in recent months, also had some positive effects, she said.

“It just brought to light the smaller situations that happen,” Davies said. “Now people are coming to terms with saying things like sexist comments are not okay. In the past, it would have been played off. Now people are willing to speak out against it.”

Students and faculty were divided about whether Stanford had done enough.

Stanford has taken aggressive action in recent years to combat campus sexual assault, university officials say, including establishing a “yes means yes” affirmative consent standard in 2012 — before it became California law — in an attempt to avoid confusion about whether sexual contact is welcome. The school requires students to learn about prevention and changed how sexual assault cases are judged, with an expectation of expulsion when a student is found responsible for sexual assault. Next year’s budget includes $2.7 million to counter sexual violence.

A Washington Post analysis of federal data put Stanford among the top 10 schools with the highest number of rapes reported in 2014, with 26.

“I think what [the case] boils down to is that there’s a real disconnect between how people perceive rape that happens on campus and rape that happens off-campus. And, really, you know, rape is rape,” said Matthew Cohen, a sophomore and member of the student senate. “It should be treated the same way whether it happens on university campus or not.”

Michele Dauber, a Stanford law professor who is friends with the victim, said that the university had yet to apologize. The woman was not a Stanford student.

“They’ve never shown any remorse that this happened on Stanford property,” Dauber said. “You create this culture, not of alcohol but of toxic masculinity, in which misogyny is really deep and it’s always somebody else’s fault.”

Dauber introduced a new course last year for sophomores on sexual assault at universities because she had “a line of girls” outside her door who said they had been assaulted. The students in the course later formed a group that advocates for sexual assault prevention.

“Stanford looks at sexual assault cases from the lens of protecting its brand,” said the group’s organizer, Stephanie Pham. “Maybe it’s this need to forge an image of a perfect university where sexual assault doesn’t happen.”

Francks, the Kappa Alpha member, said he was home the night of the party in January 2015 but went to sleep early ahead of a morning golf event. He said more needs to be done.

“Why are we training girls how not to get raped but not teaching boys not to rape?” Francks said. “A lot of changes need to be made. But some are happening already.”

ISIS Releases Longest ‘Kill List’, Over 8,000 Americans Are Its Targets

A pro-ISIS hacker group has placed nearly 8,000 Americans on its longest ‘kill list’ that also includes names of Canadians, Australians and Europeans, a British media report said today.

The pro-ISIS United Cyber Caliphate hacker group released a list of 8,318 people, including their addresses and email contact details, on a secretive messaging app service.

ISIS Releases Longest 'Kill List', Over 8,000 Americans Are Its Targets

It urged its supporters to “follow” those listed – and “kill them strongly to take revenge for Muslims”, Daily Mirror reported.

It is one of the longest kill lists any ISIS-affiliated group has distributed to date and reportedly includes the names of 7,848 Americans, 312 Canadians, 39 Britons and 69 Australians.

The rest of the targets listed are reported to be from a variety of nations including Belgium, Brazil, China, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, New Zealand, Trinidad and Tobago, South Korea and Sweden.

They are mostly military or government workers or people in the public eye, like royalty or celebrities.

The list, written in both English and Arabic, was uncovered by the media group Vocativ, which specialises in investigating the hidden side of the web.

It discovered it on a messaging app service called Telegram earlier this week.

Vocativ has refused to share further details of those named on the list.

According to a report by US intelligence firm Flashpoint, the United Cyber Caliphate was formed in April 2015 after a merger of several radical Islamic hacking groups.